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Quick Fact – Vice Crusade Tactic

Quick Fact – Vice Crusade Tactic

1913 As what the Los Angeles Times called the “the first sally in the greatest campaign that has ever been waged for the elimination of gambling” (April 7, 1913), Los Angeles Chief of Police Charles E. Sebastian offered a $100 reward ($2,500 today) for information that led to the arrest and conviction of anyone operating an illegal casino in the city. One existing operation in particular was being run in a prominent hotel and another in a well-known office building, both downtown. Officers had had difficulty procuring evidence to convict the proprietors of these enterprises because entry solely was by introduction.

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Bucket Shopper’s Dogged Fight

Bucket Shopper’s Dogged Fight

1910-1912 A crusade to outlaw bucket shopping in San Francisco began in December 1910, and one operator didn’t like it. The first attempt at anti-bucket legislation failed when California Governor Hiram Johnson, in 1911, refused to sign it despite it having passed the state Senate and Assembly. His rationale was that the state’s big cities already had such laws in place. However, in the spring, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed an ordinance that prohibited keeping or visiting a bucket shop. Henry A. Moss, a bucket shop owner and Nevada citizen, vowed to fight the new law, as it prohibited him from running his four San Francisco branches, which did substantial business. Moss claimed that he’d invested $50,000 in his business locally, that he spent $4,400 a month in telephone and telegraph charges, that he had more than 1,000 customers and that he took in about $15,000 a year in profits (about $365,000 today). His enterprise, Moss & Co., also had shops in these California locales: Sacramento, Oakland, Fresno, Long Beach, Redlands and San Diego. Locations outside of the state were in Reno, Nevada; Ogden, Utah; and Portland, Oregon. His Tactics Begin Moss immediately applied for a temporary restraining […]

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